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Mosquito Spraying for West Nile Virus
There are no comprehensive statistics about how many illnesses or environmental problems are caused by mosquito spraying, even though such incidents occur frequently. The following incidents are examples of the kinds of problems that have been reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) following insecticide spray programs around the country.
Study Links Herbicide use and Cancer
A series of studies has found that farmers develop non-Hodgkin's lymphoma more often than other people do, but until now it has been difficult for scientists to explain why this increase occurs. New research, however, shows that exposure to the herbicide glyphosate, commonly sold as Roundup, is one explanation. The study was published in 2003 by researchers at the National Cancer Institute, the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Kansas University Medical Center, and the University of Iowa College of Medicine.
Insecticide Exposure is Common: Kids are Exposed More than Adults
The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), is the first study to look at insecticide exposures of a statistical sample of all Americans. Recently, CDC scientists published an analysis of how insecticide exposure varies among Americans of different age
Minimizing Children's Exposure to Pesticides is Prudent
Do pesticides cause special problems for children? A new review of a series of research studies completed during the last decade suggests that the answer to this question is yes, and that we need to be sure that children are being exposed to pesticides as little as possible.
Permethrin and Hormones
In recent years, scientists have become increasing concerned about the ability of pesticides and other chemicals to disrupt our hormone systems. Hormones are chemical messengers that control importnat processes like growth, development, and sexual function so these concerns are significant. New research shows that the common household insecticide – permethrin – can disrupt hormones.