Visiting a Washington Clearcut

By Megan Dunn, Policy and Programs Director NCAP is excited to be part of the Washington SSB 5597 Aerial Herbicide Application in Forestlands Work Group. As NCAP's Policy and Programs Director, I serve as one of three environmental representatives invited to join the work group. Continue reading

Bees, Beetles, Butterflies, Oh My!

(By Christina Stucker-Gassi, Healthy Food and Farms Program Coordinator) For over a decade, NCAP has increased the use of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) on farms across southern Idaho. In the mid 2000s this work involved researching biological controls for early blight in potatoes. Since 2013, we have been working with a wide range of community partners to raise awareness around rebalancing predator/prey populations and boosting natural pollination services. We collaborate to conserve and restore critical on-farm habitat for bees and other beneficial insects.  Continue reading

Make a Beetle Bank

(By Laura Keir, Communications Coordinator) This summer, my 8-year-old son has found lots of interesting beetles in the wild. On a hike, he spots a large black beetle on the trail and we marvel at the long antennae. “Be careful not to step on it!” he warns other hikers. Continue reading

Yellowjackets in Late Summer

Enjoying a meal outside in late summer can be nearly impossible if yellowjackets or other wasps have taken up residence nearby. They eat your food and can be aggressive. Yellowjacket behavior makes them difficult to love, but remember that they are an important part of the ecosystem, too. Yellowjackets feed their young large numbers of insects that might otherwise damage trees or crops. They also feed their young houseflies, and lots of them. This means that when nesting in areas of little human or animal activity, just leave them alone. For areas near your home, try these steps to reduce populations. Continue reading

Oppose EPA Efforts to Weaken Washington State’s Water Quality Standards

By Glen Spain, NW Regional Director, Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA) More methylmercury. More arsenic. More polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). If we value human health, why on Earth would EPA significantly increase the allowed amounts of three of the most dangerous and persistent chemicals known – along with more lead and various industrial chemicals – in the water we drink, the lakes in which we swim, the rivers from which we fish and the fish we eat? Continue reading